Is my puppys leg broken, or twisted?

Question:
A few months ago, my puppy started limping and lifting his paw, aswell as not eating. so we took him to the vet. They wanted to do an x ray to see if it was broken, but we couldnt afford it. so They sold us anti inflamitory for the possibly twisted leg and it sort of went away after lots of rest

Now it is back, but on one of his back legs too. He is a very active little beagle puppy and runs like wild every time he plays with his doggie friends. How can i tell if his back leg is broken or just twisted? He hassnt fallen from up high or anything, just running like crazy. The legs dont look much different to each other, and he doesn't react when i touch them. But still, all he does is sleep all day and doesn't want to eat. He does eat, but not as happily as before...

I must be honest. I am having a few financial troubles at the moment and we are just getting by. im not sure if i can feed my family next month if i get him the xray at this time. I truly hope it is something we can fix from home.

What do you suggest I try? Are there any noticable differences with a broken leg or a twisted one????
Answer:
Contact your vet and ask about payment options/arrangements. A good vet will work with you in the interest of the pup's health. The X-ray is needed, a broken leg will only heal with proper treatment, lest he continue to rebreak it as it doesn't heal properly. Tendon dmg as well. Good luck, there are others here more experienced than I regarding the vets in your area and how they might be re: payment.
Answer:
I agree with Jawert. My neighbor couldn't afford the xrays and didn't bother asking for payments and the dog's leg atrophied and shrivelled up. Poor doggy.
Answer:
I also live in Ottawa and know several vets that may be able to help you. You are unable to receive pm's so you can email and I will give you the info.

stacey@dogsdenlearningcentre.com
Answer:
I agree; take him back to the vet and ask about payment plan.
Answer:
First, I agree with all other posters, that your dog must see a vet and that you should inquire about a payment plan. Second, and I do not want to alarm you and was going to keep my fingers shut - but - when you watch your Beagle walking, try and determine if the problem appears to be in the joints of the actual leg OR AND THIS IS THE IMPORTANT PART, is the problem with the paw itself - front first and then the back. Also is the back paw dragging at all. You should put your fingers under the back paw that is troubling your paw as he is walking - he should instantly correct the slight "t5trip" you have caused. If not, the problem might not be with the leg it could be disc related. I had a Beagle many years ago - lived to be nearly 20 with no health problems. Then came the Dachshunds - major disc disease. The limping front paw was the sign of neck disc disease - he had already suffered from back, so this symptom was not expected and at the time not really discussed. Beagles are now suffering a form of neck/disc disease - not to the extent of Dachshunds - but still undergoing same surgery. I know this only because after our last little guy had his surgery and we were told he would have less than a year, I mentioned to our fabulous neuro that perhaps it was time to get a Beagle - this is when he told me that the 2 dogs he had recovering at home from same surgery were Beagles. Guess he didn't want me to find out the hard way. This of course is worst case scenario, but perhaps mention it to your vet - hopefully your vet has experience with this type of problem. If the limp is indicative of disc problems the meds will relieve some of the pain only temporarily as the damage to the discs continues. Really hope it is something else. Perhaps you could qualify for vet financing - pamphlets at vets. Big problem will be if your pup needs surgery, it will have to be performed by a specialist - a neurologist if disc related or an ortho if say luxating patella or cruciate ligament. Please keep us posted on what your vet says. If you have a full body X-Ray a good vet will be able to see if the neck discs are calcified - calcified back discs are much easier to read.
Answer:
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